Local Food Council to Support Growth in Sector

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Minister Carlier and Associate Minister of Health Brandy Payne announce Local Food Council recruitment with industry partners at a Calgary urban farm. (Photo: Government of Alberta)

Applications are now open for Alberta’s first ever Local Food Council. The aim of the council will be to provide recommendations on provincial policies, programs, pilot projects or initiatives to support the continued growth and sustainability of Alberta’s local food sector.

Recruiting a Local Food Council is the first step in implementing the Supporting Alberta’s Local Food Sector Act that was passed on May 30.

“Our government is stepping up to show support for this industry and the people who put food on our table,” said Oneil Carlier, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry. “The Supporting Alberta’s Local Food Sector Act and our new Local Food Council will give a voice to this growing industry by helping it find new markets, create new jobs and further diversify the provincial economy.”

The council will have broad representation from Alberta’s local food sector across the province, including small producers and processors and those with specialized and academic knowledge, and would report to the minister within one year.

“Urban farming is one way to reconnect people with their food and how it’s grown,” said Dennis Scanland, Calgary urban farmer, Dirt Boys, president of YYC Growers and Distributors, co-founder of SunnyCider. “Local food is about accessibility and being invested in the land, your food and your community. We need to start conversations about local food production, break down some of the perceived barriers for people to get involved and engage citizens.”

Members will be selected from a public recruitment process, which is now open on the Alberta public agency board opportunities website. Stakeholders with an interest or knowledge of the local food sector are encouraged to apply. Applications close July 12.

The legislation requires the council to examine:

  • Potential barriers and challenges for local food producers and local food processors, including specific challenges faced by small producers and processors.
  • Local food aggregation and distribution.
  • Risk-management tools for local food producers and processors.
  • Increasing access to local food.
  • Consumer awareness of local food.
  • Certification opportunities for local food producers and local food processors.

Source: Government of Alberta

Recognizing a Century of Alberta Farming and Ranching Dedication

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(Photo: Government of Alberta)

The Alberta Century Farm and Ranch Award has honoured over 1,750 farm families in Alberta since its inception in 1993. An Alberta Agriculture and Forestry program, the award salutes those families who have continuously owned and actively operated the same land for a minimum of 100 years.

Applications for the award, including eligibility criteria, are available on the Alberta Century Farm and Ranch Award webpage. Eligible families are provided with a bronze plaque, many of which are proudly displayed throughout rural Alberta. Families often have special celebrations and reunions to mark the occasion of receiving their award.

Since 2013, the department has held summer recognition events throughout rural Alberta to bring recipients together. This year, 96 families have been invited to recognition events taking place in unique rural venues across Alberta:

    • Nisku, June 21
    • Olds, June 28
    • Camrose, July 5
    • Medicine Hat, July 26
    • Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village, August 2
    • Grande Prairie, August 12

View all the Alberta Century Farm and Ranch Award recipients.

For more information on applying for a Century Farm and Ranch Award or the summer recognition events please contact Susan Lacombe at 780-968-6557.

Source: Alberta Agriculture and Forestry

Farm Income Estimates for Alberta

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Statistics Canada has released its 2017 farm income estimates for Canada and the provinces, as well as the first quarter 2018 farm cash receipts (FCR) estimates. Roy Larsen, senior statistician with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry examines the Alberta numbers.

In 2017, Alberta had a healthy farm income situation with several records set, says Larsen. “Total FCR for the province surpassed $14 billion for the first time to $14.1 billion, a 4.5 per cent increase from 2016. Fuelling the gain were higher crop and livestock market receipts plus program payments to producers.” Total FCR is the sum of crop and livestock market receipts plus program payments to producers.

Crop market receipts set a new record, up 3.9 per cent to $6.9 billion. “The growth in receipts was largely driven by higher marketing and prices, notably wheat and canola,” explains Larsen. “Some of the other crops posting gains were oats and flax, with chickpeas, dry beans and corn setting new highs. Receipts for barley, dry peas, potatoes and lentils decreased.”

Livestock market receipts were up 4.6 per cent to $6.4 billion, the second highest on record, says Larsen. “It is mainly due to increased marketing, notably cattle. Market receipts for cattle and calves rose 4.8 per cent to $4.8 billion, the third highest on record. Hogs were up for the first time since 2014. Posting record receipts were dairy, poultry and eggs.”

Total program payments to producers increased 9.7 per cent to $764.1 million, “That was largely due to higher payments under Crop Insurance, AgriStability, AgriRecovery and Compensation for Animal Losses,” adds Larsen.

Total farm operating expenses rose 3.8 per cent to a record $10.5 billion. Says Larsen, “Notable increases included livestock/poultry purchases and machinery fuel/repairs, while commercial feed and fertilizer/lime fell.”

Alberta’s net cash income (NCI) – the difference between FCR and farm operating expenses – increased 6.8 per cent from 2016, to a record $3.6 billion. “Likewise,” says Larsen, “Realized net income (RNI), which is NCI adjusted for depreciation and is a non-cash cost, grew 10.3 per cent to a record $1.8 billion. Overall, total net income (TNI) was practically unchanged, just down marginally 0.3 per cent, at $2.2 billion.”

Alberta’s total FCR in the first quarter 2018 was $3.9 billion, down 5.7 per cent from the first quarter of 2017, says Larsen. “The decline was due to lower crop market receipts, down 9.4 per cent, and program payments to producers, down 31.8 per cent, more than offsetting higher livestock market receipts, which was up 3.7 per cent.”

Nationally in 2017, Alberta ranked first among provinces in total FCR and cattle and calf receipts. Alberta ranked second to Saskatchewan in NCI, RNI and TNI. Alberta accounted for 22.9 per cent of the national total FCR of $61.6 billion.

For the first quarter of 2018, Alberta was second to Saskatchewan in total FCR. Nationally, receipts fell 5.3 per cent from the same period in 2017 to $15.4 billion. “The decline was not unique to Alberta, as receipts fell for most provinces,” adds Larsen.

Data from the release is available via the Statistics Canada website. The tables are as follows: annual farm cash receipts (Table 32-10-0045-01), net farm income (Table 32-10-0052-01), and quarterly farm cash receipts (Table 32-10-0046-01).

For more information about these farm income estimates for Alberta, contact Roy Larsen at 780-644-1308.

Source: Alberta Agriculture and Forestry

South Korea, Japan Halt Wheat and Flour Sales from Canada Over GMO Plants Found in Alberta

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South Korea has joined Japan in suspending trade in Canadian wheat following the discovery of a small number of genetically modified plants in southern Alberta.

It’s standard protocol in both countries to temporarily close markets in such cases, Global Affairs spokesman Jesse Wilson said Monday.

“The Government of Canada is working with foreign trading partners to ensure they have all the necessary information to make informed decisions and limit market disruption,” he said in an emailed statement.

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Parliament Must Pass the CPTPP: Cereals Canada

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Implementing legislation for the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) is now in Parliament.  Canada has a chance to demonstrate much-needed leadership and cooperation on trade with like-minded global partners.  It is imperative for Parliament to pass this legislation before its summer recess. This agreement will unlock valuable trade opportunities all while enhancing prospects for the growth and diversification of Canadian agriculture.

The Government of Canada recognizes the important growth potential for agri-food exports and increased contributions to our economy.  The latest budget set an ambitious target to increase agri-food exports to $75 billion annually by 2025, up from $64 billion today.  The CPTPP offers a path towards this goal.

The case for trade diversification is stronger in today’s political climate.  The uncertainty and risk surrounding the ongoing renegotiation of NAFTA are troubling enough.  The acrimony after the G7 meeting in Charlevoix drives home the need to expand export horizons.  Implementing the CPTPP is a concrete opportunity for Canada to improve access and competitiveness in new markets.

Livelihoods across the country are tied to agricultural trade.  From our ports in Vancouver and Montreal, mills and manufacturing plants in Winnipeg and Toronto, to family farms and agri-businesses, international trade sustains jobs in every region, city and rural area of Canada.

Looking more closely at the CPTPP, we see that its benefits for Canadian agriculture revolve around three key areas.

First, lower tariffs achieved through this agreement have a direct impact on Canadian competitiveness. This is particularly important for value-added agri-food products, many of which have traditionally faced high tariffs in export markets.  But it is also critical for commodities like wheat and canola, where Canada will have preferential access to key markets such as Japan and Vietnam, thereby matching the gains achieved by Australia.  Somewhat ironically, the CPTPP will also give Canada a leg up against the U.S. in high value Asian markets.  Many agriculture groups in the U.S. are openly disappointed by their country’s withdrawal from the CPTPP for this reason.  But to lock-in these benefits, Canada must be among the first countries to ratify the agreement.

Second, through the CPTPP Canada and its partners are upgrading the rules of trade. Predictable, risk- and science-based trade rules play a key role in facilitating access to markets.  As a modern, ambitious and comprehensive trade agreement, the CPTPP sets higher standards for participating countries while creating a more predictable and transparent trade environment.  Stronger science-based and risk-based rules for agricultural trade will help limit the potential for protectionist barriers and encourage greater investment in innovation.  Adoption of new technologies leads to productivity enhancements and new commercial opportunities.

The improvements to the trading rules through the CPTPP are critical for Canadian farmers and exporters who are increasingly facing unjustified market barriers around the world. A strong and ambitious agreement between Canada and CPTPP partners sets common standards that reduce the likelihood of trade friction, while offering stronger dispute resolution mechanisms when issues arise.  It should be noted, however, that Canada also has an onus to enforce these rules when issues emerge – as is the case with Canada’s ongoing challenges for durum exports to Italy, under the Canada-European Union Free Trade Agreement (CETA).

The third benefit, and perhaps the most important, is that the CPTPP is viewed as an opportunity to provide leadership in promoting multilateral trade policy cooperation. In the wake of withdrawal and rising protectionism by traditional trading partners, the importance of achieving these outcomes is clearer than ever.  What’s more, as the global economic and political center of gravity shifts towards Asia, Canada will be well positioned to deepen its trading relationships and shape global business standards.  Once the agreement is in place, it is highly likely that new countries, perhaps even the U.S., will seek to join, further strengthening the agreement’s scale and benefits.  Canada must be at the table with the terms for new entrants are set.

The CPTPP is a tremendous opportunity to build and diversify markets.  The agreement will build jobs in both rural and urban Canada and it will help grow the Canadian economy.  With the implementing legislation for the CPTPP now in Parliament, Canada has a chance to play a leading role by joining the first six countries to ratify the agreement.  This will demonstrate Canada’s commitment to international trade while promoting continued cooperation, against the backdrop of rising protectionism and uncertainty.

The spotlight is now on Parliament to ratify the CPTPP.  Farmers can do their part by taking the time to write, call or meet with their Members of Parliament to encourage ratification before the expected June 22 recess of Parliament.  Farmers’ voices matter so take the time – it will be good for your business.

Source: Cereals Canada

Looking Up: Real GDP and Alberta’s Agri-Food Industries

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The real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for Alberta’s agri-food industry rose again in 2017. Jean Marie Uwizeyimana, agri-food statistician with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, examines the numbers.

In 2017, Alberta’s GDP for agri-food industries rose 2.5 per cent to $6.5 billion, the second consecutive year of growth. “At 12.5 per cent,” explains Uwizeyimana, “These industries represented the third highest percentage share of the total Canadian agri-food GDP after Ontario and Quebec.”

The GDP for the province’s primary agriculture industry increased 1.9 per cent to $3.5 billion in 2017. “Of this total, the GDP for crop and animal production rose 1.8 per cent to $3.4 billion,” says Uwizeyimana. “Support activities for agriculture increased 5.3 per cent to $108.0 million.”

Food and beverage manufacturing industries in Alberta grew at a faster pace, increasing 3.2 per cent to $3.0 billion, adds Uwizeyimana. “It has been increasing for the last five years. The food manufacturing industry GDP rose 3.4 per cent to $2.5 billion, while the beverage manufacturing industry increased 2.2 per cent to $474.3 million.”

Meat products manufacturing continued to be Alberta’s largest food segment. “It accounted for roughly $1.0 billion, or 38.1 per cent, of total food manufacturing GDP,” explains Uwizeyimana. “Grain and oilseed milling ranked second at $296.5 million, or almost 12.0 per cent.”

Overall, Alberta’s economy in 2017 increased 4.9 per cent to $304.7 billion, as measured by real GDP, after declining for two years. Alberta also led all provinces in economic growth, with mining, quarrying, oil and gas extraction as the main contributing industries. Nationally, GDP also grew 3.3 per cent to $1.7 trillion: the strongest year-over-year increase since 2011.

GDP is one of the primary indicators used to measure the performance of a country’s economy and is an important tool when comparing the performance of different jurisdictions. It represents the monetary value of all goods and services produced over a specific time period and is often referred to as the size of the economy. Adds Uwizeyimana, “As it is collected in nominal – or current – dollars, comparing two periods requires making adjustments for inflation. Real GDP is GDP adjusted for inflation.”

Source: Alberta Agriculture and Forestry

Take this Weather and Climate Webpage with You

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Alberta and Agriculture and Forestry (AF) has just launched its weather and climate mobile-friendly webpage. Ralph Wright, head of agro-meteorology with AF, explains the features of this weather app and how it can help Alberta producers.

“What this app is doing is taking all the different sources of weather information we have out there and putting it in one place – that is – on your mobile device,” says Wright. “Typically, most weather apps are just getting forecasts. The thing that always struck us about the forecasts is that it doesn’t show what happened yesterday. That is a very important question for farmers. For example, when you talk about winds and when to spray, the forecasts aren’t that accurate as to when the winds might diminish in the evening or maybe when they start picking up in the afternoon, or for that matter, what range of directions have they been blowing in.”

This app lets producers look at all of the hourly data for winds for the past few days, says Wright. “If we’re in a stable weather pattern – today is much like yesterday – you can start getting some pretty good ideas when today’s winds may pick up or subside. You can look back over the last couple of days, and also see what the gusts were like. So, if you’re thinking of spraying right now, you can take a look at what the winds are at several weather stations in your area. If they are all similar, there a good chance your area will be the same.”

The app also features Environment Canada’s radar superimposed over Google maps. “You can zoom right in on your quarter section,” adds Wright. “You can see the storms coming in real time, as the radar is updated every 10 minutes. Our handy little play back slider lets you move it forward and backward to get a good feel for how fast it’s moving, where it’s going and how long it may last. The radar also lets you see out a few hundred kilometres to see if there is anything coming beyond the horizon.”

The app keeps records of temperatures at different times of the day. “We all know what tomorrow’s temperatures are forecast to be, but what was the temperature last night,” says Wright. “Perhaps you sprayed a couple days ago, and you don’t know how low the temperature dropped. Did you get frost? Maybe the temps dipped down to 3 or 4 degrees and the plants “shut down” temporarily. It could mean a recent herbicide application may not have been as effective as it should have been. We now have those records for producers to see.”

The app features precipitation amounts recorded at weather stations around the province. “This is particularly important for producers who have insured on the weather stations for lack of moisture,” explains Wright. “People are insuring on precipitation amounts for AFSC’s Lack of Moisture insurance programs, and they can go take a look at any time to see how much rain has fallen. This is particularly important near AFSC’s cut off times, giving the insured some insight into whether or not a payment may be triggered.”

Insects – alfalfa weevil, bertha armyworm, wheat midge – are part of this app. “It will give you the heads up for scouting, some awareness of how the insects are developing, and then help you to make decisions whether or not you need to spray,” adds Wright.

Fusarium head blight is another category on the app. Says Wright, “This webpage will tell you whether conditions right for infection. If they are, it’s time to be extra vigilant.”

Most of the weather station data being displayed goes back up to two months, including hourly data. “However,” adds Wright, “We also have an almanac which allows you to go and explore climate data back to 1961. What we have available now is growing season precipitation for the last 58 years. Here, we can see that Fort Vermilion has been in a dry spell since the drought of 2002. But looking back further you can a long series of dry years in the 1960s and early 1970s. You can also look at corn heat units and frost free days. We will continue to add more features, so stay connected.”

The mobile webpage also features more detailed Environment Canada forecasts, weather alerts, and the fire risk index that goes back seven days.

Find this mobile friendly webpage at www.weatherdata.ca/m to add to your smart phone’s home screen. For more information about the webpage, contact Ralph Wright at 780-446-6831.

Source: Alberta and Agriculture and Forestry

 

canolaPALOOZA Coming June 27

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canolaPALOOZA returns to the the Lacombe Research & Development Centre on Wednesday, June 27, 2018.

There really is nothing like canolaPALOOZA – with over 100 experts spread across more than 25 learning stations  there really is an expert answer for every canola question

The event is free to attend, and you set your own schedule as you visit the learning stations of your choice – and all at your own pace.

2018 Learning Stations And Speakers

This list of researchers and agronomic specialists from across Canada will continue to expand more will be added right up until the event.

Stand Establishment – learn about how TSW should impact your seeding rates, and what your optimal plant density could be.

  • Autumn Barnes, Canola Council of Canada
  • Matthew Bernard, Saskatchewan Agriculture
  • Larry Michielsen, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Greg Semach, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Kristina Polziehn, Axiom Agronomy
  • Sheldon Toews, Bayer CropScience

Canola Fertility – look for damage in our demonstration plots and discuss options for managing seed-placed fertilizer in canola.

  • Warren Ward, Canola Council of Canada
  • Thomas Jensen, International Plant Nutrition Institute
  • Ray Dowbenko, Nutrien
  • Wes Anderson, Mosaic Company
  • Doon Pauly, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry

Blackleg – learn how to best use blackleg resistance genes to protect the long-term profitability of canola on your farm.

  • Justine Cornelsen, Canola Council of Canada
  • Ralph Lange, Innotech Alberta
  • Kim Kenward, 20/20 Seed Labs

Sclerotinia – look at new research that explores the European practice of bud-stage fungicide application and learn about sclerotinia prediction tools.

  • Nicole Philp, Canola Council of Canada
  • Kelly Turkington, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Mike Harding, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry
  • Kevin Zaychuk, 20/20 Seed Labs
  • Noryne Rauhaula, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Jackie Bussan, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada

Clubroot – does pH play a role in clubroot infestations, after all? Ask world-class experts about your options for managing or preventing clubroot on your farm.

  • Dan Orchard, Canola Council of Canada
  • Sheau-Fang Hwang, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry
  • Bruce Gossen, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Mary Ruth McDonald, University of Guelph
  • Victor Manolii, University of Alberta
  • Nicole Fox, University of Alberta
  • Brittany Hennig, University of Alberta
  • George Turnbull, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry
  • Keisha Hollman, University of Alberta
  • Leo Galindo González, University of Alberta

Verticillium – learn how to identify verticillium in your canola and check out recent maps of where this new disease has been found in the prairies.

  • Clint Jurke, Canola Council of Canada
  • Christina Eynck, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada

Insect Pests – cabbage seedpod weevil (CSPW) was traditionally a southern Alberta pest but it has been pushing its boundaries and has recently been found as far north as Lacombe. Learn about CSPW and flea beetle management and update yourself on new survey plans for your area.

  • Keith Gabert, Canola Council of Canada
  • Scott Meers, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry
  • Shelley Barkley, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry

Beneficials In The Field  learn about the many beneficial organisms- from predators & parasites to the viruses & bacteria that control pests for free.

  • Hector Carcamo, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Jennifer Otani, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Vincent Hervet, University of Toronto
  • Amanda Jorgenson, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Patty Reid, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Meghan Vankosky, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Shelby Dufton, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Sherrie Benson, University of Alberta
  • Ralph Cartar, University of Calgary
  • Jess Vickruck, University of Calgary

Bees & Pollinators – learn about the sweet relationship between canola and all pollinators, including how commercial beekeepers are working with farmers in a mutually beneficial partnership.

  • Gregory Sekulic, Canola Council of Canada
  • Lee Townsend, TPLR Honey Farms
  • Lora Morandin, Pollinator Partnership Canada

Pre-Seed Weed Control – is it time to mix-up your pre-seeding weed control strategy?  Learn from the experts and explore different cultural and chemical pre-seed weed control options.

  • Bob Blackshaw, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada (Retired)
  • Laurel Perrott-Thompson, Lakeland College
  • Sonia Matichuk, FMC Agricultural Solutions
  • Graham Collier, NuFarm
  • Bruce MacKinnon, BASF

Canola Harvest Management – get an exclusive sneak peek at the new Combine Optimization Tool, a web-based tool to adjust your combine during harvest, plus talk to the experts about whether swathing or straight cutting is right for you.

  • Angela Brackenreed, Canola Council of Canada
  • Shawn Senko, Canola Council of Canada
  • Nathan Gregg, Prairie Agricultural Research Institute
  • Daryl Tuck, Straight Cutting Canola Producer

Reduced Tillage And Soil Health – the benefits of reducing your tillage can be found below the surface as well in the savings in fuel, manpower and equipment hours. Stop by this station to discuss solutions to agronomic issues that don’t involve disturbing the soil

  • Rob Dunn, FarmWise Inc.
  • Peter Gamache, Past Manager of the Reduced Tillage LINKAGES program

NEW: AgraBot, the Open Source Diy Autonomous Tractor –

Come see what’s being developed in Free and Open Source software called AgOpenGPS for Precision Agriculture. Auto Steer, Section control, and Autonomous Ag Vehicles for minimum cost that can be built at home. Watch how to set up a field and then see a tractor complete that field all on its own. Let’s learn about today’s technology and the possibilities and potential of open source for the future.

WEEDit Demo – demonstrations of the weed-IT will run throughout the day. Check out how it uses chlorophyll detection technology to minimize chemical usage.

  • Tom Wolf, Agrimetrix Research & Training
  • Andreas Mellema, WEEDit

Harrington Seed Destructor – see how this innovative addition to a combine can process chaff to ‘destruct’ weed seeds.

  • Charles Geddes, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
  • Louis Molnar, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada

Aerial Imagery – so you have a drone, but what are you doing with the images or video you are capturing. Stop by this station to learn what you can do with the images you are capturing.

  • Markus Weber, LandView Drones Inc.
  • Adrian Moens, AJM Seeds Ltd.

110 Years Of Weather Data – back by popular demand… learn what the trends are in temperature and precipitation averages and extremes. Are the trends favourable for crop production?

  • Murray Hartman, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry

Winter Wheat – winter wheat experts will focus on the benefits of including this crop into a sustainable cropping system. Listen to our Western Winter Wheat Initiative team discuss the value of seed treatments, seeding rates, and new varieties for the 2018 season. Don’t miss out on this epic adventure!

  • Janine Paly, Western Winter Wheat Initiative
  • Monica Klaas, Western Winter Wheat Initiative
  • Brian Beres, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada

Pulse Crops – The Alberta Pulse Growers station includes peas and faba beans and will showcase agronomy related to disease and insect pests. Come on out to learn more about profitable pulses, the crops that put the N in your soil and keep the dollars in your pocket!

  • Robyne Bowness Davidson, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry
  • John Kowalchuk, Alberta Pulse Growers
  • Nevin Rosaasen,  Alberta Pulse Growers
  • Jenn Walker, Alberta Pulse Growers
  • Jagroop Kahlon, Alberta Pulse Growers

Wheat – visit the Alberta Wheat Commission for information on fertility management in new wheat varieties.

  • Sheri Strydhorst, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry
  • Brian Kennedy, Alberta Wheat Commission

Canola Oil – Local and global markets – As a grower you definitely know how to grow, feed and harvest your way to a maximum yield canola crop. However, can you tell your city cousins what happens to your canola after you deliver it to the crush plant? What are other uses for canola and canola products? There are at least two dozen novel uses and one involves an airplane.

If you want answers to these and many other consumer-oriented questions stop by our booth and play Plinko. Come over to the consumer side – we have popcorn. Seriously, we will be serving popcorn. … plus learn about all the places in the world that Canada exports canola and canola oil to.

  • Bruce Jowett, Canola Council of Canada
  • Tanya Pidsadowski, Alberta Canola
  • Brooke Hames, Alberta Canola

Team Alberta – Advancing Policy On Behalf Of Alberta’s Crop Sector – Come and have your fortune told and unlock what Ag Policy beholds! See what the future has in store for various issues affecting your farm: Transportation (Bill C-49), Trade (NAFTA, CPTPP, CETA), Crop Protection Products (Neonics, Matador), Sustainability (Farm Sustainability Readiness Tool, Environmental Farm Plan), and Labour (Ag Coalition, Employment Standards, Temporary Foreign Worker Program).

  • Karla Bergstrom,  Alberta Canola
  • Shannon Sereda, Alberta Wheat and Barley
  • Jadon Hildebrandt, Alberta Canola
  • Edward Hale, Alberta Wheat and Barley
  • Sam Green, Alberta Wheat and Barley
  • Michelle Chunyua, Alberta Canola

Keep It Clean – Learn about what growers can do to keep their crop export ready and the activities that the Canola Council of Canada is working on to make sure sure that the crop protection products and latest genetics are granted market access.

  • Brian Innes, Canola Council of Canada
  • Heidi Dancho, Canola Council of Canada

Canola Grading – Stop by and visit with Canadian Grain Commission to learn about how your canola and other crops should be graded and to learn more about the harvest  sample program that is 100% FREE for farmers.

  • Scott Kippin, Canadian Grain Commission
  • Romeo Honorio, Canadian Grain Commission
  • Ann Puvirajah, Canadian Grain Commission

Ag Safety & Be Grain Safe – Grain Entrapment Demo – the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association will have their grain entrapment trailer on site and will be doing demonstrations that show how quickly grain entrapment happens, and how to safely extract a trapped person, plus information to help you improve safety on your farm. AgSafe Alberta will have a hazard assessment, spot-the-hazard display to demonstrate practical on-farm hazard management programs to incorporate into daily operations

  • Donna Trottier, AgSafe Alberta
  • Maria Champagne, AgSafe Alberta
  • Rob Gobeil, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association
  • Nicole Hornett, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry

Roam & Refresh Gator – keep an eye out for the gator travelling around the site and delivering refreshments – your chance to have a conversation with President of the Canola Council of Canada and the General Manager of Alberta Canola.

  • Jim Everson, Canola Council of Canada
  • Ward Toma, Alberta Canola

Equipment Sanitation Demonstration – weigh your options for soil removal on everything from tractors to trucks to quads.

  • Greg Daniels, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry
  • Blake Hill, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry

Canola Research Hub &  Canola Performance Trials – stop by the big tent and learn how to harness the power of the Canola Research Hub and the  Canola Performance Trials websites, plus pick up any of the free publications & resources

  • Taryn Dickson, Canola Council of Canada

 

Please Note: While there is no charge to attend canolaPALOOZA, you do have to purchase your own lunch and snacks from the food trucks – please bring cash.

Source: Alberta Canola

 

Canada OKs Bayer takeover of Monsanto

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Canada’s Competition Bureau has conditionally approved Bayer’s planned takeover of Monsanto.

Its approval is contingent on Bayer AG divesting some of its Canadian canola, soybean and vegetable seed, traits and herbicide assets before it will allow the German pharmaceutical giant to purchase agricultural business Monsanto Company.

The watchdog says in a consent agreement filed Wednesday that if the assets aren’t divested the takeover would likely “substantially lessen” competition in Canada’s seeds and crop treatment sector.

Bayer previously said the assets would be sold to German chemical company BASF SE for 5.9 billion euros.

 The bureau says it is reviewing the suitability of BASF as a buyer for the assets.

Bayer has canola seed facilities in Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia and herbicide operations within the country.

 Its consent agreement comes a day after Bayer won approval from the European Union and the U.S. for its US$66-billion takeover of Monsanto.

It took two years for it to get U.S. approval because of concerns around the impact the deal would have on farmers.

Bayer still needs approval from Mexico before it can close on the deal.

Alberta Pulse Growers now a member of Soy Canada

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The Alberta Pulse Growers Commission (APG) recently became a member of Soy Canada to reflect the increased interest Alberta producers have in growing soybeans.

According to APG chair D’Arcy Hilgartner, APG has been observing on the sideline the development and evolution of Soy Canada.

“As our growers begin to see the opportunity that new genetics provides in their area for soybean production, we want to be on top of the industry challenges and opportunities,” he says. “Soy Canada will take care of the greater issues around market access, market development and is a policy voice for the soybean industry. We look forward to participating as a member of the organization.”

Soy Canada is the national association uniting all groups driving the Canadian soybean industry, from farm to marketplace.

“Committed plant science companies and innovative producers have been key partners as Canadian soybean production has expanded from one to eight provinces in a single generation,” said Ron Davidson, executive director of Soy Canada. “Soy Canada is very pleased to welcome Alberta Pulse Growers and its members as important new and valued participants in the national voice of this country’s soybean sector.”

Soybeans are expected to be planted on 6.5 million acres in Canada this year with acreage in Alberta increasing to 21,000. Canadian farmers are on track to reach the industry target of 10 million acres by 2027.

Soybeans are included under APG’s purview and, therefore, levy collected when soybeans are sold to Alberta dealers goes to APG. The organization then uses the levy to support agronomy, research, extension, marketing and other activities to benefit soybean growers as it does for the growers of peas, beans, faba beans, lentils and chickpeas.

Current soybean research projects supported by APG include work on identifying promising genotypes and optimizing seeding density, nitrogen fixation and irrigation for cost-effective soybean production in Alberta.